Tag Archive: case hardin


59832831_2835369863156182_5602576901085331456_nA couple of weeks back those awfully nice people at Songs of Praise put on a bit of a blinder of a show. Ex- Case Hardin main man Pete Gow was the headline draw aided and abetted by a band garnered from the great and good of the Clubhouse Record’s roster and a 5-piece string section. In a church! On a Saturday Night! With a bar!

Now, I would have thought that this would be seen as being something a bit special but apparently not. Despite features in The Adver, Ocelot, Swindonian, SOMR and the like, it failed to pull many at all. It was up against some stiff competition with The Radioactive Zombie Mutant Bikers From Hell in town to play loose approximations of tired classic rock songs and Fred Spode offering his take on Joe Bonamassa numbers – so, covers of covers of covers. And what is it with Joe Bonamassa? Apart from blues aficionados, no one had heard of him 5 years ago and now he is touted as some sort of minor diety by cover bands!

Anyway, I digress. So basically you weren’t there, and I have the maths to prove the probability of this sweeping statement. And because you weren’t there you not only missed a glorious set from the aforementioned Clubhouse posse, you missed a elegant and eloquent opening set from Tamsin Quin, helped by Jamie R Hawkins, no slouch as a singer-songwriter himself. It looked a lot like this….

There were plenty of “gutted I missed it,” comments and Instagram hearts after the fact, which is either lovely or annoying depending on your viewpoint, and of course, the lesson learned is that shows like this don’t happen often and when they do they need to be supported. “I’ll catch the next one” doesn’t work if the promoter decides that there is no point doing the next one.

I was just going to post the video and leave it at that, but I do get annoyed at what I perceive as apathy for shows which really bring something new and add a new dimension to an already struggling live circuit. Rant over, I’m off to eat cheese and listen to Mazzy Star, enjoy your Sunday.

70352532_10156836773674412_6272372326432505856_nI used to write a weekly music column. I used to be someone. I could have been a contender. Look at me, Ma! I’m on top of the world! Ahh well, fuckem! I hope that the Swindon Advertiser’s policy of appealing to a “younger crowd” via a more “online platform” is working out.

Still, I thought in the interest of drumming up a bit of excitement for some really cool bands I have had the pleasure to work with over the years, I would drop a few names about as, in all likelihood, they won’t get much of a mention anywhere else, not being grunge tribute bands or husband and wife acoustic pop cover duos.

There is a connective point for all of this and that point comes in the shape of a splendid chap called Tim Emery, a man of high sartorial taste and low-slung basses (as pictured) and who I first got to know as the four-stringer with the most excellent Case Hardin.’ Though right from our first conversation it was clear that our respective musical histories were intertwined through various odd musical acquaintances, strange sleazy bands and even sleazier venues. Case Hardin’ have, sadly, called it a day but front man Pete Gow brings his solo show to Christ Church, yes, an actual flippin’ church, aided and abetted by a Clubhouse Records assembled band plus the Siren Strings, for a night of dulcet alt-country crooning and gorgeous classical sweeps on 28th September. If you need a dose of the charming Tamsin Quin (and who never needed that) then that is also the place to be.

The aforementioned Mr E is, as far as I know, not part of that set up but you can find him at The Beehive on Friday 20th with CCRR…or Creedence Clearwater Revival Revival. No guesses who they pay tribute to but fans of The Snakes should note that there are a lot of familiar faces to be found lurking within this wonderful gang.

Emery-watchers will also be able to get a double helping of our crepe-shoed hero striking some poses and throwing some shapes with Last Great Dreamers. Back up to full strength after a recent three-piece excursion, this bunch of Dickensian clad, power-popping, trash-rockers open Fatboy’s Cancer Charity at Level 3 on Friday 4th October as well as popping up again on the Saturday for an acoustic set in The Rolleston. And just look at the company they will be keeping….

So the question is do we call this EmFest or Timapolloza? Or maybe not bother. The votes are in….it’s a resounding not bother.

Some logistics and links…

FRIDAY 4th OCTOBER 2019

DOORS OPEN 6.45pm

LAST GREAT DREAMERS 7.30 – 8.15
Tax The Heat 8.30 -9.30
Rock Goddess 10.00 – 11.15pm

SATURDAY 5TH OCTOBER 2019

ROLLESTON STAGE DURING AFTERNOON
Alicia Griffin 1.45pm – 2.15pm
The Lawless 2.30 pm – 3.00pm
Dangerous Kitchen 3.15pm – 3.45pm
Wolfpeake 4.00pm -4.45pm
Last Great Dreamers 5.00pm – 5.45pm
DOORS OPEN 6.00pm

MAIN STAGE
SPACE ELEVATOR – 7.00pm to 7.40pm
HOLLOWSTAR – 7.55pm to 8.40pm
Bad Touch – 9.00 to 9.45 pm
The Quireboys – This Is Rock And Roll – 10.00 pm to 11.15 pm

And finally, and just to mess up the chronology of this article even further…hey, rock and roll isn’t about following the rules, Level III is also the place to be this Saturday (21st) for Steve Tilling’s much talked about proggy/alt-rock/stripy trewed Circu5. They are joined by I Am The Manic Whale and another band with a Swindon connection, Let’s Swim, Get Swimming. Bands do have some strange names these days…he says eyeing his Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band album in the corner of the office.

Well, there you are, hopefully I’ll see some of you around for a pint and possibly an intense discussion about which is actually the best Waterboys’ album.

Nothing ever happens in this town yaknow?

 

18195037_10155309848293308_5220412152281987086_nIn some respects this week is the calm before the storm, the deep breath before the plunge, the prawn cocktail before the chicken in a basket…okay, that one is a bit dated, a quieter week before next weekend’s annual Swindon Shuffle hoves into view. But there is still enough to whet your musical appetites and it isn’t every week that a music venues gets given a new lease of life and a major league act rolls into town.

The current wave of younger, local indie bands shows no sign of losing momentum with three of the finest bands of the moment taking the stage at The Victoria tonight. Basement Club make accessible, textured and fluid music based around funky grooves and nuanced guitar work, Xadium take a harder-edged route into the indie-rock sound and Kaleido Bay juggle some sumptuous and psychedelic sonics to make their sound.

A real slice of old school Americana and outlaw country comes to The Beehive in the form of Christopher Rees who delivers tales of optimism and consolation with a dash of whiskey wisdom via a passionate and memorable voice and deft rootsy songs.

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13925568_10153787229178457_2827194294073760264_oNot too much to get through this week and obviously the offerings are of a more mainstream and accessible nature, after all no-one wants an avant-garde, dystopian, post-rock band as the soundtrack to their works shindig. Well, no one except me.

At The Victoria you can catch Phlemmy’s Christmas Karaoke, a night of seasonal shenanigans and mischief in the main venue itself. Ideal for work’s parties or anyone looking for one last big knee’s up. It’s Wacky Wednesday with bells on…literally.

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14468193_10153789195910025_4105194703030807599_oIt’s nice to see another week where Swindon continues to embrace original and often out of town bands, if nothing else it gives me nothing to moan about as the length of this introduction attests to.

Thursday

Flight Brigade, George Wilding Band and TriAmi @ The Victoria

If some of the recent big names have hailed from a slightly earlier time, Flight Brigade (pictured) is a band bang on the moment. Festival favourites, beloved by bloggers and journalists and adored by the more adventurous side of the national radio posse and tonight you get to see why. If the idea of a folk heartbeat wrapped in layers of indie cool, rock drive and pop sensibility and then delivered with energy and style doesn’t get your blood pumping then you may as well give up on music and go back to your Stephanie Meyer novels and your collection of vintage manhole covers as it doesn’t get much better than this.

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13116233_1147335191965449_4162624693147308179_oI’m happy to see that the autumn dance card of bigger, out of town acts is continuing with some pace. Tonight, Songs of Praise bring you the first of four gigs they have scheduled around town, beginning at The Victoria for some highly accessible alt-rock fusion.

Flight Brigade sit in the same place as the likes of Imagine Dragons or early Arcade Fire, blending lush indie soundscapes with radio friendly melody, elements of folk sit at its core but get wrapped in swathes of energy, passion and panache. Also on the bill is George Wilding who continues his journey from nostalgia tinged troubadour to forward thinking textured pop icon and TriAmi, a fantastic folktronic trio who have the ability to say more in the atmospheric spaces within their songs than most bands can with actual chords and words.

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Case Hardin take their name from Boston Teran’s noir thriller ‘God Is A Bullet’ (Pan 2000). In the finest tradition of naming groups, it came about by virtue of being little more than a character name in the book songwriter Pete Gow was reading when the call came through that they had secured their first gig; necessity was, as is so often the way, the mother of invention on that day.

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10407052_774034392662307_1668943267993678268_nAs regular followers of my scribbling will be more than aware, tribute bands are not really my cup of tea, but there is one aspect to them that I find fascinating. The band’s name. It’s an area that can lend itself to acts of creative genius. After all why call yourself the Real Smiths, when you can be The Iain Duncan Smiths and why be the plain old Bowie Experience when you can be Camp David. It’s an art form in itself. Others that smack of sheer brilliance include J’Amy Winehouse, Motorheadache, Sean Connery’s favourite band Oasish and the total honesty of Kaiser Thief’s (“I just nicked a riot?”) Mentioned in dispatches are – Repeater Gabriel, Husker Don’t, Surely Bassey and vegetarian nu-metallers – Quorn!

And if you are into odd band names then you might be interested in Oui Legionnaires at The Victoria tonight. Odd name, odd music, odd people. Take a dose of angular indie, throw in warped pop melodies and punk energy, pile it all up into a heap and stand on the top. From there you may just be able to catch a glimpse of the genre that the band fall into. Best you just go along and work it out for yourself. Support from punk s Rebel Station and two-piece blues outfit The Harlers makes for a very eclectic bill.

Friday delivers the first of four Songs of Praise shows over the coming week. Staying at The Victoria, a line up of cinematic indie and dream pop vibes courtesy of the welcome return of Wyldest (pictured) a band with its formative roots in Swindon but now making waves on the national circuit. Fans of Warpaint will want to check out the same sort of musical furrows being ploughed by Cat Bear Tree and the night is kicked off by the brilliant White Lilac, a blend of post punk drive and Cocteau Twins like atmospherics.

At the other extreme, The Rolleston plays host to an act that is lewd, crude, “ Life-affirmingly puerile” according to no less than Charlie Brooker, hilarious and offensive in equal measure and it is brilliant. Mr K and The Gang (even the name has to be edited for general consumption) bring the UK tour to Swindon in the company of local drum and bass noise-merchants 2 Sick Monkeys and comedic punk from Mike Gibbons.

But fear not, less challenging options are also available. The Locomotive, for example, has more familiar offerings via funk, blues and soul played in a very improvisational way, old songs with new twists from Chameleon. Syntronix at The GWR are riding the 80’s nostalgia trip, not the one were you are stood in a muddy field watching The Wonder Stuff wearing a Coal Not Dole t-shirt drinking overpriced lager out of a plastic beaker (i.e. mine) but one that sounds more like the Top of The Pops version, synth-pop at it’s finest from Kraftwerk to Depeche Mode, New Order to Ultravox.

The big one for Saturday happens at The Castle with the long awaited return of The Pagan Fringe. There are so many reasons to go to this. It is 25 years since their album Gathering Light was released and you can now pick it up on CD. Proceeds will go to the Swindon-Calais Link Refugee Aid Charity, reason alone to support the gig and buy the CD. Maybe go along as a way of honouring the much missed Steve Carvey, the bands original drummer. On top of all of that go along for great music and to catch up with people you last saw propping up the bar of The Monkey Club and other long forgotten, half-mythical venues.

At The Locomotive, the sad news is that Colour The Atlas have pulled out of the Songs of Praise gig but you can still catch the brilliant Balloon Ascents, a rising Oxford band who mix dreamy wooziness, pop hooks and darker undercurrents.

Tributes are also flooding in, as it were, The Rolleston have The Doors of Perception which ticks the 60’s box, The Victoria has Lizzy and The Banshees, so that’s the late seventies sorted and Riffs Bar has the next decade covered with Hot Rox playing an 80’s set.

The third Songs of Praise offering can be found at The Beehive on Sunday with Case Hardin’s fantastic blend of haunted country meets lo-fi rock and roll and support from The Incredible Disappearing Boy who sound like Wilco writing underground Americana classics for a late night drive along the M4. Two bands about which I just can’t say enough nice things.

Gig four from Swindon’s seemingly busiest promoters is at their usual pitch at The Roaring Donkey on Wednesday with the politically astute Steve Leigh from Kitchen Sink Drama’s and a rare set from Graham Mattingley. Blimey, that’s quite a week.

10407052_774034392662307_1668943267993678268_nAs regular followers of my scribbling will be more than aware, tribute bands are not really my cup of tea, but there is one aspect to them that I find fascinating. The band’s name. It’s an area that can lend itself to acts of creative genius. After all why call yourself the Real Smiths, when you can be The Iain Duncan Smiths and why be the plain old Bowie Experience when you can be Camp David. It’s an art form in itself. Others that smack of sheer brilliance include J’Amy Winehouse, Motorheadache, Sean Connery’s favourite band Oasish and the total honesty of Kaiser Thief’s (“I just nicked a riot?”) Mentioned in dispatches are – Repeater Gabriel, Husker Don’t, Surely Bassey and vegetarian nu-metallers – Quorn!

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