Tag Archive: chip daddy


426615_307388412659174_1530646521_nA bit of a Curates Egg for seekers of original music this week and those not familiar with Victorian satire should Google the phrase immediately. If, however, you are one of those people that are content to hear music with an already existing pedigree, then you will have a field day. But, tonight at least, there is something truly original on offer. Songs of Praise at The Victoria is always striving to bring in bands that tick boxes to do with boundary pushing attitudes, uniqueness and fresh sounds and tonight they have excelled themselves.

 

Nudybronque is a band that have built up quite a reputation over the last few years, evolving from a perfectly pleasant punk-pop four-piece to a truly mesmerising experimental indie band and the release of their latest e.p. Moondog merely confirmed them to be a band writing some of the best tunes in their field today. Tonight they are joined by Port Erin, another band who have striven to push the boundaries of their own musical development, these days plying a musical trade of space and atmospherics, subtle dynamics and an almost jazz inflected quality. Opening the show is Oui Legionnaires, a band that almost defies generic pigeonholing instead preferring to invent their own terms such as puzzle-pop and yelpcore. No idea what that means? No, me neither, may it’s best you check them out.

 

Something far more describable is at The Beehive in the guise of Robert Brown, a troubadour whose style falls on the less fey side of Nick Drake and the sweeter edge of Jimmy Page.

 

The big event for Friday is the Ocelot Magazines Eighth Birthday bash at The Victoria. Being a publication with strong connections to the local music scene, you can imagine that they are able to pull in the best bands around and this line-up is a bit of a corker. Headlining is the newly re-emerged Racket, now fully embracing their brit-pop leanings and elevated to a five piece but with all the live swagger and attitude that you associate with the band of old. Vienna Ditto offers a contrasting sheen of wild-eyed rockabilly riffs and sparse, atmospheric electronica whilst looking like collaboration between a mad scientist and a jazz chantress. Boss Cloth brings the noise, as it were, a heavy yet melodic wave of grunged rock riffs and drum dynamics. Opening the night will be Chip Daddy (pictured) a man as well known for his outrageous off stage stunts as he is for his onstage rap parody.

 

Rumbustious…that’s a good word isn’t it? Rumbustious music can be found at The Beehive courtesy of M.O.D. who play Balkan inspired folk using everything from washboards to double bass, harmoniums to clarinets and will be playing songs from last years wonderfully titled Travelling at The Speed of Cattle. If something smoother is called for, Benji Clements will be playing in full band mode at The Royal Oak and the ska and reggae creations of SN Dubstation can be found at The Liquor Lounge.

 

Other options are the rock, blues and swing standards of The Teddy White Band at The Rolleston and classic covers from Switch at The New Inn.

 

On Saturday, Level 3 features a night of music in memory of DJ, radio presenter and all round good egg, Tom Humber who sadly passed away a year ago. As a devoted rock and metal fan he would certainly have approved of the bands paying tribute; melodic trash metallers In The Absence of Light, heavy biker-rock with a dash of Southern charm from Eye For and Eye and Dodging the Bullet playing iconic rock covers. Meanwhile next door at The Rolleston Metal Gods cover similar musical ground and the music of Paul Rogers of Free and Bad Company fame, is being re-visited at The Victoria.

 

Reggae music is being celebrated by The Shocks of Mighty DJ’s at The Beehive and more pop and rock standards can be had from In It For The Money who re-launch the band at Riffs Bar and Echo at The Swiss Chalet.

Sunday sees the Lazy Sunday Afternoon Session re-locate to the bandstand in Old Town Gardens and from 5pm you can have fun in the sun (you never know) with acoustic music from Blake, Rob Beckinsale and as ever your hosts, Mr Love and Justice.

Final mention of the week goes to those dapper acoustic Latin-jazzmen, Gilmore’n’Jaz who play the Roaring Donkey on Wednesday and whom I can’t recommend highly enough.

Library - 97There was an interesting debate online the other day that centred around the age old problem of punters not supporting gigs, the same “use it or lose it” clichés being thrown around as well as the usual one-upmanship of how some people want to be seen as being  more passionate about music than others. One thrust of the argument tried to lay the blame squarely on the punter along the lines of “we are putting these gigs on and you are not attending, it’s your bad” (as they say in US teen comedies.) However, this if we build it they should come argument is, in my opinion, all arse about face (as they say in UK radio farming dramas.) Even in financially tough times, if you put on a gig that is attractive enough to the punter, then people will turn up. The point I think that was being missed by the opposing camp was that a lot has changed since they were young, finger on the pulse, gig goers. People don’t access their music in the same way anymore; there are so many free alternatives available in the comfort of your own home to actually going out to a gig. Music is all over the TV, sites like Spotify gives you free access to a lot of music, the internet allows cottage industry bands to get their music directly to the punter (hence the demise of HMV, who, to be fair, must have seen it coming) maybe attending live gigs just isn’t that important to a lot of people as it was ten or twenty years ago. Maybe it’s as simple as the people moaning about no one attending the gigs they are putting on, are simply billing the wrong bands! Does Tesco attack the man in the street for buying Sainsbury’s products? No they do some research and try to create a more appealing product.

So what happens if you put the right bands on? Well quite a lot. My own night, Songs of Praise had a pretty good turn out considering the weather and the post Christmas financial crash that most people are feeling. Original music on a Thursday night is always tricky round here so to get 30-40 people in was very pleasing. Rock music might seem to have been done to death but there are still some great bands putting a different edge on things. Openers Adepto Futui (pictured), now  playing in a classic three piece formation managed to mix self-deprecating between song banter with some blistering raw electric blues that would sit quite happily alongside your Jon Spenser Blues Explosion collection. Up all the way from Cardiff, Spyglass played a polished set of alt-rock that married the density of grunge with some aggressive classic rock grooves and headliners SkyBurnsRed did their usual line of effortless rock, classical sweeps, dark and atmospheric songs and funky leggings.

The following night The Furnace also proved that if you do it right, then people will take notice. I got into a bit of bother a while ago when I suggested that the venues break with its old associations is both painful for some and totally necessary. In fact what I said exactly was:

I’m glad to see that The Furnace is getting its act together again. More gigs seem to be taking place and more diversity within those bookings is most welcome. Gradually shaking off its creatures of the night association has not been easy on the DJ’s and promoters who have been driving the change, but hopefully those Buffy The Vampire Slayer fixated, pretend pagan, narrow minded, goth-metalers who bemoan the loss of their lair, but who in reality never supported in particularly great numbers anyway, will now be relegated to the chat rooms and forums where they can ritually curse the new direction and bitch about the old days viewed through blood-tinted spectacles.

 

A barrage of abuse followed mainly from people trying to defend their rose-tinted image of Level 3. You don’t have to tell me about those days, I was there. A lot! Yes it was great, yes it was busy but the important word if WAS. If you want to re-capture those days you have to re-create it with the tools available and that’s what tonight was all about. The new tools in this case lay largely on the pop side of indie. Two local openers set the scene, Salute The Magpie who channel the spirit of The Smiths via more recent Indie sounds such as The Maccabees, and the wonderful cinematic folk- pop blends of indie soundscapers, Old Colours played to the biggest crowd of the whole night. The headline acts have just come to the end of a national tour and even though they are not the biggest names to have passed through the venue since the change of management, they still managed to keep a reasonable amount of the crowd after the local interest had left the stage. Pop used to be a dirty word but Portia Conn and her band play the sort of pop that easily dispels the generic travesties of the past, auto-tuners and clichéd dance routines. Instead we are reminded that pop can produce soulful and fresh music played with style by wonderfully charismatic live bands. Whoddathoughtit?

Young Kato splice rock and pop and create the best of both worlds with the attack, attitude and drive of the former and the fun and melody of the latter. And although the crowd had dwindled somewhat by then, those that remained were there to have a good time and bounced along to their effervescent tunes, in fact it was a capsule moment of what had been taking place all night as the gig had attracted a slew of hip popsters and cool indie kids out to have a good time. A sea of funky hats, ironic knitwear, skinny jeans and future-retro styles flitted about the room, a splash of fun and colour where not so long ago you would only have seen an ocean of black. It also became the focal point for a gathering of the great and good of Swindon and muso spotting from bands old and new became the order of the day. In my i-spy book of ligging and name checking, I managed to tick off a couple of  The 211, a Youngblood, an Off Chancer and even got extra points for a good chat with the boy racer himself, Chip Daddy.

To paraphrase Jeff Goldblum in Jurassic Park “Music finds a way” Even in these difficult times, the audience is out there. There was a time when maverick promoters could afford to run the line, I’m giving them what they didn’t know they wanted, fine when there is an excess of disposable income and people turn out in larger numbers. For now it’s all about giving the punter what he wants and understanding that if people aren’t turning up to shows that you are putting on, the answer to the problem might lie closer to home than you realise.

Library - 48So, it’s coming to that time again, the race for the coveted Christmas number one spot is upon us, or as it should be known, the inevitable public pedestal for Cowell’s latest crooning cash cow. You almost feel sorry for Joe McElderberry, being usurped by those nasty Rage Against The Machine fans and their shouty, sweary anarchist sentiments. You could argue that all these “let’s stick it to Simon” campaigns designed to overturn his god given right to be the Christmas number one puppet master, is just as orchestrated and convoluted as the thing it is protesting against. Maybe, but this year there is a really good alternative.

 

Gaz Brookfield has released a special version of his song Diet of Banality in an attempt to add a bit of spice to the race for the top spot. Imagine if this years Christmas number one was a rant against all those previous style over substance tunes and their dance routines, skimpy outfits, gimmicky rap-middle eights and the like. Oh the irony! Well if you all head over to Gaz’s website, Amazon or iTunes you could be part of the best piece of seasonal satire and festive japery the charts have witnessed in a long time. Do it!

 

Talking of japes, The Victoria has three less than serious acts for you tonight. Dole queue hero and anti-PC rapper Devvo headlines with the boy racer Chip Daddy and the best/worst cover band of them all, Kova Me Badd, also on the bill.

 

The Beehive hosts Sophie’s Xmas (as opposed to  + vent Sunday or E-ster, I suppose) Charity Bash which in the usual eclectic style of the venue will feature fire jugglers, street magic and music from Doeser, Missin’ Rosie, Erin Bardwell Collective to money for Swindon Sands.

 

Younger fans are being catered for at The Furnace in the form of Teenage Kicks Christmas Special (part 1), which has a wonderfully experimental undercurrent. Tides of Change deliver alt rock with a pop punk vibe, Sasquatch Walk does a neat line in jazzy punk disco and With Felix adds in some ambient electro-indie. Make sure you check out openers The Weekend Effect, I was really impressed with their rapped up indie groove. Interestingly enough there isn’t going to be a Teenage Kicks Christmas Special (part 2) but then I guess if the world is ending there really isn’t much point.

 

To celebrate our imminent doom on Friday (unless the Mayans got it wrong…my, won’t we look foolish?) There are a couple of Apocolyto-parties going on. At The Victoria, party band Breeze will be providing the soundtrack whereas The Furnace has one amazing line up for you. Briefly it goes like this, The Racket – elegantly wasted gutter anthems, Nudybronque – intelligent, intense and fired up pop, The Rhubarbs  – The Beatles on Speed, The Street Orphans – slick, sophisticated indie, SkyBurnsRed – searing and dark alt-rock with a classical sweep and The Fixed – exuberant indie.

 

Other parties come in the form of Slagerij’s very messy Christmas at TP’s; ska-punk mayhem from one of Swindon’s success stories and taking Hell Death Fury, Escape From ’98 and The Useless Eaters into oblivion with them.

 

The Beehive goes down a slightly more sedate path with the fiddlesome roots rockers State of Undress. If our are a fan of The Albion Band, Fairport Convention or even The Strawbs then this is for you.

 

Saturday brings along the annual musical curveball at The Victoria, The 12 Bands of Christmas. Each band gets to do two covers; the more out their usual comfort zone the better. Previous years have seen the Blowbacks turning Cliff Richard’s Devil Woman into a feedback-drenched tribute to Sonic Youth. Matt Kilford abandoning his usual restrained approach and screaming, “Lick my legs!” when covering PJ Harvey’s ‘Rid of Me’ and Si Hall somehow matching the stratospheric range of La Roux. Need I say more?

 

 

After the bizarre offerings of that you may want to find some nostalgic, late night comfort at The Furnace when DJ Dust will be hosting one of his irregular Level 3 reunion nights. Party like its 1993 all over again, Kurt is still alive and Strictly Come Dancing is still eleven years in the future.

 

Finally Sunday afternoon at The Beehive brings a wonderfully pairing of bands and not just because they share a drummer. Rumour Shed plays music that is wonderfully chilled, reflective, richly poetic and quietly majestic. Accompanying them are The Shudders, a band just beginning to get back into their stride after too long away and guaranteed to make you want to bop, boogie and booze in equal measure. And it’s all free.