Tag Archive: faye rogers


LSA-Vol-3-Cover_1The Lazy Sunday Afternoon sessions have become a well-established part of the local circuit, having brought a wealth of new acts into town via its monthly shows. Fans of acoustic, folk and roots music are well catered for and this, their third music sampler, acts as an excellent calling card and memento of what these shows represent.

 

The 9 tracks that mix the local talent with acts that you might not have otherwise come across, begin appropriately enough with the session hosts, Mr Love & Justice. Never Know Why perfectly sums up the bands lilting west-coast influences and rippling guitars dovetailed with their  quintessentially English approach. Younger, female singer songwriters are well represented with the delicate, pastoral pop of Faye Rogers, the soulful vibes of Tamsin Quin and Charlie-Ann Bradfield’s more chart glancing, Goulding-esque Army Bird.

 

Ever the traditionalist, Ed Hanfrey’s contribution, Mimi & I, is a timeless piece of folk that would be as comfortable in a small tent at Cambridge Folk Festival as it would be in the corner of a pub any time in the last three hundred years. Beasts of Their Own by Ells and the Southern Wild takes a dark and dynamic path through the folk genre and James Daubney provides a wonderfully dexterous instrumental to round things off.

 

But it is the two bands that I am less familiar with that really caught my attention. Naomi Paget’s reflective questioning vocal forms the core of What If? By Light Falls Forward, but the music it rests on is equally as impressive, weaving wonderful layers of subtle textures. Similarly, The Orient Express conjure exotic soundscapes, referencing traditional Turkish music as much as they do Western folk and the resulting Gelevera Deresi is reminiscent of Loreena McKennitt’s world music excursions.

 

So, buy the album, go to the shows and support the great work that is being done under the banner of Lazy Sunday Afternoon in hosting some amazing local, and not so local artists.

Night Visions – White Lilac

10849822_403110526506455_7389361583777842695_nWhen you have spent the last two years building up a musical identity, have been well received both by audiences and media and have managed to find a group of musicians to work with who bring exactly what is needed to your songs, why would you suddenly head off down a new musical path. Well, I guess some musicians are braver than others, whilst some are happy to wander the road that leads to safe mediocrity a path they seem destined to follow for the rest of their musical careers, others have visions and seem driven to head off into uncharted territory to realise them. Faye Rogers is on that latter journey.

Having made a name for herself as a sweet pastoral acoustic troubadour, this first release, a teaser for a planned future record has, in my eyes, already eclipsed everything that has gone before. A glimpse of her new sound was presented at a recent live show and although still a bit rough around the edges it raised a whole set of questions not to mention a few eyebrows. Those questions that have now been more than answered by Night Visions.

 

Drawing a line under what has gone before, writing a whole new set and even rebranding the band White Lilac to obscure that past in a wonderfully “year zero” fashion, her true calling seems to have revealed itself. Chiming electric guitars replace the acoustic strum of before and her voice suddenly seems framed by exactly the right musical surroundings. Cymbals wash in the distance and as a brooding cello helps build the atmospherics you find that where her music was filled with fading summer light and a warm breeze, now there is a moonlit ethereality, a gothic beauty and a spine-tingling expectation. Then the secret weapon is brought into play and a sonorous and sensual saxophone drifts by before the band rock out to a glistening crescendo.

 

This is not only the bravest musical re-invention I have come across in a long while, also on the strength of this first release White Lilac are a band who I am anticipating great things from.

thSome weeks things just seem to fall into place and the local music diary features four…yes, four, amazing events as well as the usual selection of regular gigs. So without further ado…

 

Sheer Music is one of the leading lights of music promotion in Wiltshire. Under the leadership of that awfully nice chap Kieran Moore, they have brought acts such as Frank Turner, Foals, Ben Marwood, Gnarwolves and many more to a venue near you and tonight they celebrate 10 years in the game with a show at Level 3. Headliners are the aptly named Decade (I see what you did there) a band who show you what pop-punk can do once it stops sniggering at it’s own in-jokes and graduates from college. Their songs are infectious and bouncy and their stage show is one long adrenaline rush. Also on the bill are Light You Up, With Ghosts and Hey Vanity.

 

If that isn’t your musical cup of tea then why not try some chilled harmonies, dreamy acoustica and ambient folk. Heading an all female line up, The Cadbury Sisters bring their tour to Songs of Praise at The Victoria. Theirs is a half forgotten dream world that evokes childhood memory, otherworldly harmonies mixing the fragile and fey with darker themes, Swallows and Amazons meets The Wickerman perhaps. Adding to the nature of the night is the delicate songs of Faye Rogers and a rare outing for the sublime Emily Sykes.

 

If blues is more your thing then head to The Beehive for Georgia guitarist Kent DuChaine a player who authentically delivers the spirit of all those wonderful old bluesmen from Robert Johnson to Son House and all three Kings – BB, Albert and Freddie!

 

A real melding of artistic disciplines can be found at New College on Friday as Chicago poet, Don Share, is joined on stage by local live musicians as part of the Swindon Festival of Poetry. In this unique and improvised show, Don is joined by Barry Andrews, Jon Bucket, Brendan Hamley and Catherine Shrubshall. Barry sums it up best when he explains “(Don) gets off the plane, steps on stage and then what happens, happens. And it will never exist in that way again.”

 

More conventional but no less exciting shows also can be found around town. The Rolleston plays host to funky, lap steel, blues maestros HipRoute with support from Stone Donkey Pilots. Out at Riffs Bar the Acoustic Session features the dexterous acoustic guitar work and subtle lyrical touch of David Waddington but if you want something a bit more loud and shouty then head to The Victoria for Slam Cartel, a band who distil the essence of rock ‘n’roll in the same why that bands such as The Cult and The Four Horsemen did in their heyday. Joining them are local sleaze-metallers The Damned and The Dirty.

 

And if you like the sound of that gig, you are going to love this one. On Saturday Level 3 opens its doors for the Swindon Alternative Festival Volume 3, a celebration of the best of local rock, punk, grunge, hardcore and metal. It’s an all-dayer and there is too much going on to mention all the bands but a few that caught my eye are Sleep inertia, SkyBurnsRed and headliners Skreamer, but check out the event page on Facebook for the full details.

 

The last of the big events to get a mention this week and one that will have all you proggies champing at the bit is Pendragon’s Megadaze (pictured) event at Riffs Bar. This two-day event includes a first hearing of the new album, Men Who Climb Mountains, 2 unique Pendragon live shows, food, quizzes and a chance to hang out with band and fans alike. A crucial date for all prog-rock diary’s.

 

Elsewhere you can catch a Dire Straights tribute at The Victoria or Going Underground paying tribute to post-punk, ska and mod classics at The Rolleston.

 

The Moonrakers is the place to be on Sunday as The AK-Poets play a stripped down, early evening session. All the usual great song writing and live presence but presented in a manner more fitting for the Sabbath day.

10349094_566351956803162_3626054594936056313_nWith the exception of Tibetan Jazz aficionados and fans of the burgeoning Polynesian trip-hop scene, most musical tastes will be catered for this week. Variety, as they say is the spice of life and this weeks musical offerings prove to be a particularly fine condiment of existence.

 

Acoustic buffs should head to The Victoria tonight for a rather special triptych of players, headed by Darren Eeddens, a bluegrass and honky-tonk folkster as at home on the banjo as he is the guitar. A story telling troubadour in the truest sense, he describes himself as an old soul with the imagination of a child. Local support comes in the form of the elemental sounds of Drew Bryant and the atmospheric endeavours of Andrew Burke.

 

The newly revamped Beehive will be echoing to the sounds of Built For Comfort who channel the sound and the vibe of a late night, smoky, back room Chicago blues club.

 

And Friday, it would seem, is the new Saturday judging by the amount of gigs you have to choose from, a myriad of styles and genres running from the sublime to the ridiculous. Representing the sublime is Faye Rogers at Riffs Bar. Hers is a sound that has grown gracefully from an innocent, “girl with guitar” solo spot to a band that soundscape around the tunes with shimmering guitar riffs, sensuous cello washes and less is more beats. Joining her is Antoine Architeuthis who mixes Celtic jauntiness with sweeping English pastoral folk sounds and just a splash of eastern spiritualism to weave an exotic musical tapestry.

 

Representing the ridiculous (only joking chaps) is The Hamsters from Hell, rhythm and booze experts whose talents at wrapping a risqué lyric around a grinding r ‘n’b groove is exceeded only by the speed at which they can run up an impressive bar tab. Catch them at The Queens Tap.

 

It’s folk Jim, but not as we know it. Actually it’s The Model Folk. Forget finger in the ear, bearded, jumper wearing folk police who still harbour a grudge over Dylan going electric, this is Balkan inspired, punked up gypsy folk with a fixation for railways, soviet farming machinery and 1930s drag queens…apparently. Catch them at The Beehive not least because they use the word rumbustious in their band biog’ and you have to admire a band who keep such words in circulation.

 

Level 3 continues in its mission to throw off the gothic imagery and nu-metal fixations of the past (I can see the music forums ablaze already over such a comment) and embrace a broader musical sensibility by hosting a night of reggae. Empower the Gambia, a charity that aims to improve conditions in rural Gambia brings you cool reggae sounds from Bobo Blackstar and The Tribe.

 

Something more familiar can be found at The Victoria with Fleetwood Bac (I’ll let you work out what they are all about) and at The Rolleston where The Dark Eyes will be playing covers through the ages from the sixties to the present.

 

In a change from their usual Thursday slot, those awfully nice people at Songs of Praise have a Saturday show at The Victoria. The top slot is taken by Colour the Atlas (pictured) a band whose chilled, cinematic and atmospheric brand of trip-pop (if such a term is allowed) has seen them lauded by critics and touring with the likes of Newton Faulkner. Check out their brilliant new single “That Sound” now and then watch them live, right on your doorstep. Also clutching a new release is Alex Rainsford, who creates a sound that embraces the drive of rock and the dexterity of folk and throws in soaring vocals and heartfelt sentiments. And opening the night is Charlie Bath a singer-songwriter who needs no introduction to the discerning local music fan. If a crystal clear yet warm vocal, emotive lyrics and wonderfully crafted songs are your sort of thing, then make sure you get to this gig on time.

 

If you are after something more visceral, then The Rolleston may have the answers, as The Keith Thompson Band will be firing off salvos on incendiary blues-rock in the style of Moore and Gallagher.

 

And finally the Sunday afternoon session at The Beehive has what can be best described as “3 in the morning, porch blues” courtesy of David Bristow.

993496_10151749777031146_1227491858_nSo there I was looking for inspiration to write this opening paragraph, trawling the Internet for interesting facts from which to spring into wondrous literary prose or at least amusing anecdote. Sadly, for all it’s billions of facts and articles the internet doesn’t seem to work like that and most of the information to be found between the postings of cats who look a bit like Hitler and the latest Justin Bieber antics seem an exercise in pointlessness and posture. I say most, as there were a few interesting nuggets to be found. For example did you know that David Bowie invented Connect 4? Air conditioning is actually helping to prevent global warming by cooling the earth. The fact that Mount Rushmore resembles famous American presidents is pure coincidence. Chicken pies actually came before the egg sandwich.  114% of the statistics found online are exaggerated for comic affect. Some of these might not be true, it’s like Abraham Lincoln famously said at Gettysburg, “not all quotes found on the Internet are accurate.”

With that in mind the best place to find out what is going on musically is here. I have done all the rigorous checking for you and can assure you that this 100% accurate, subject to change, the information given to me by promoters, the fickleness of musicians and natural disasters!

Tonight at The Victoria, Songs of Praise throw another loud and shouty collection of bands into the mix. The AK-Poets will be gracing the headline spot for their trade mark show of riotous, razor wire rock ‘n’roll riffing, meticulous melodies and more alliterative descriptions than you can throw a thesaurus at. Support is courtesy of the wonderfully named punk ‘n’roll outfit, Molotov Sexbomb and the opening salvo comes hard and heavy from Headcount. Old school rock and roll is back on the menu it would seem.

Something a bit more soothing can be found at The Beehive as Mambo Jambo mix up roots and world music styles into a cultural diverse musical odyssey. If something altogether funkier is your thing then The Soul Strutters at Baker Street is the place to be.

On Friday we have offerings that run from the sublime to the ridiculous. At one end we have Metalhead playing rock and metal classics at The Victoria and at the other it’s Showaddywaddy at The Wyvern Theatre. Blimey! In between those extremes you can find the eerie, understated acoustica of We Ghosts at The Beehive, whilst The Rolleston opts for fired up electric blues-rock with Keith Thompson and his band. Keith has worked with everyone from a pre-Motorhead Mick “Wurzel” Burston to Ruby Turner so musical quality is guaranteed.

Out at Riffs Bar the regular acoustic session features Jenny Bracey and Last Flight Home.  After trawling trough the copious amount of information on offer for this gig I can tell you that the former is a singer-songwriter and the latter is a new musical vehicle for Missin’ Rosie frontman Joe Rendell. That is all.

It’s the usual pre-dominance of standards and nostalgia on Saturday with a couple of exceptions. Towing the line are 1000 Planets at The Victoria with a set of punk, goth and new wave blasts from the past, The Great Nothing play rock classics at The Rolleston after which if you move down stairs to Basement 73 you will get another set of classic rock and metal from Dodging The Bullet. Meanwhile, at The Greyhound you will find Bombshell playing, wait for it….rock covers, anyone see a pattern forming here?

If you are looking for something to break the cycle, Splat The Rat play Folk Beat at The Castle, a blend of modern folk acoustica put to a world music back beat.

Also moving to the beat of their own drum is Nudybronque who launch their new e.p. at Riffs Bar.  After months holed up in a secret location in Old Town they have emerged with a more diverse sound, a raft of great songs, a shiny new CD and the same brand of charisma, lunatic charm and stage presence that got them noticed in the first place. To help them celebrate the night they have invited some of their favourite acts to join them. The Get Outs will play punked out rock, The Interceptors, infectious ska and Faye Rogers provides a gentle acoustic start to the evening.

More delicate acoustic sounds can be found at The Roaring Donkey on Wednesday in the shape of tousle hair troubadour Billyjon.

Live and Local Podcast

swindon105_5logo-300x186This weeks PRS edited version of the Swindon 105.5 arts program is a live session with Familiars and features music from  Benita Johnson, Rob Richings, Faye Rogers and Easter

 

Go to the link – Here

 

1796525_750781054933610_2117433872_nIt seems as if there is an acoustic music session taking place in one pub back room or another almost every night of the week at the moment. Landlord’s checklist: Beer, punters, authentic Spanish cuisine (prepared by a chef called Barry from Newport Pagnell) and young songstress/bearded troubadour with a great live anecdote about supporting Newton Faulkner. Right open the doors! Whether we have a large enough pool of acts to sustain all of these shows and at least keep them varied and interesting, remains to be seen. The up side of the situation is that at least you will have no excuse for not catching Faye Rogers playing live.

 

Although still young Faye has been a local live fixture for a while now and it has been great watching her develop her craft, gain confidence as a performer and build a local (and these days not so local) following. On paper, it would seem, that there isn’t much to set her apart from any of the other young, sweet-voiced girl with an acoustic guitar acts that you can’t help but trip over on any Friday night out in town these days. But, by taking her natural innocence and shy disposition and singing about the essence of young life in a very mature way she creates something truly magical and quintessentially English.

 

But you don’t have to take my word for it as she has just released Thunder, a 4-track e.p. which sums these qualities better than my words can.  Framed only by minimal cello, piano and her own delicate guitar style it is very much Faye’s voice that sits central to the songs. Her vocal delivery is not about virtuosic tricks, trendy Goulding-esque timbre or tremulous vibrato, it is about getting the message across, something she does brilliantly due to the inherent tenderness in the telling of the tales.

 

Although the music has a mellow quality it speaks volumes and when it is playing, even just as back ground music, I can’t concentrate on anything else until the CD ends. What more can you ask of music?

421623_337560366296411_100955706_nA bit blowy out isn’t it? Still, as long as the wind is coming from the right direction you can use it to propel yourself to one of the myriad of gigs that is taking place this week. Think of it as a climate related, musical, Russian roulette. Head out of the front door and see where the wind and the Gods of Fate carry you. Who knows, you might just discover your next favourite band.

 

A whole bunch of candidates for that title can be found at the latest Songs of Praise at The Victoria. Known for her enthralling songs built from, understated piano and emotive vocals, tonight Louise Latham is being joined by her sister Suzie on guitar, so this is a real treat for fans of her work. Support for this comes from the intimate and Buckley-esque style of Luke De-Sciscio and the shimmering, gossamer delicacies of Faye Rogers. A night of compelling and magical music and no mistake.

 

Similarly acoustic driven sounds can be found at The Beehive as Keith Thompson plays a sampler of the raw and honest songs that can be found on his Steel Strings and Bruised Reed album. In a night of acoustic offerings, other options are Bookends at The Art Centre, a tribute to Simon and Garfunkel and acoustic covers from Stripped at The Wheatsheaf.

 

All sorts of things going on musically on Friday, so it shouldn’t be too hard to find a gig with your name on it. A good place to start is at The Victoria for The Smokestack Shakers a genre twisting band who take ska and bluebeat and add liberal doses of Latin rhythms and the simmering blues vibes of harmonica and slide guitar.  You also get a DJ set from Erin Bardwell for your money.

 

Fans of superbly executed, fired up electric blues should do everything they can to get tickets for Larry Miller (pictured) at The Arts Centre but if you like the idea of saxophone driven, 50’s swinging rock’n’jive then the place to be is The Rolleston for the Imperial G-Men.

 

A few acoustic options are also up for grabs. At Riffs Bar in celebration of landlady Tiggy’s birthday, Mark Wilderspin will be leading a scratch band of musical waifs and strays and the usual open mic’ spots are available prior to the gig proper.  At The Beehive, Stressechoes will be serving up their usual brilliantly harmonics and well crafted acoustic creations whilst David Marx at The Roaring Donkey, minus his usual AK-Poets, will enthral you with his mix of melody, tunesmithery and eloquent interludes. As the saying goes, Dave (pardon the familiarity) is indeed the home of witty banter.

 

At The Victoria on Saturday you can catch a tribute to Genesis covering both the Gabriel and Collins eras whilst at The Phoenix Bar in Wootton Bassett you will find Hammond organ driven blues standards courtesy of Shades of Blue. Punters should remember to adopt a proper blues name for the night to add to the authenticity. Joe, Willie, Joe Willie, Willie Joe, Hank and Poor Boy are all acceptable choices. Derek, Keith and Damien are not permissible blues names; no matter how many men you have shot in Reno!

 

The Rolleston has a bit of a treat for you with the welcome return of Bristol’s Natural Tendency, a euphoric high mix of emo-rock and futuristic synth grooves that will connect with the “get up and boogie gene” in even the most reclusive barfly.

 

Putting a new twist on the standard piano trio is Rob Terry who plays Baker Street on Tuesday. Mixing contemporary jazz with modern classical he weaves his way through a musical landscape that references the likes of Chopin and Grieg, as much as it does the more expected jazz icons.

 

We wrap the week up with the chance to catch Singer-Songwriter Jenny Bracey at The Crown on Wednesday, or if you are looking for a bigger musical experience, Ten in a Bar will be unveiling a new show of humour and harmonies called Brand New Day at the Art Centre, always wonderful value for money.

February at Songs of Praise

February at Songs of Praise

1185071_656401631049473_470672266_nA New Year, a new start. Time to select a blank canvas and start sketching a fresh picture or more relevant to this column, pick up a new instrument and play a new tune. T.S. Elliot put it well when thinking of New Year and fresh starts when he so eloquently said,

 

“For last year’s words belong to last year’s language

And next year’s words await another voice”

 

But then on the same subject of celebrating the start of a new year, Paris Hilton slightly less eloquently said,

 

“ I get half a million just to show up at parties. My life is, like, really really fun”

 

Which to me says something about how society is spiraling out of control.

 

So, in this quieter time of the year there is room to stop and reflect on what you want from the local music scene this year. It has been a time of belt tightening and cut backs, musical austerity if you like but that is not to say that we can’t do something about that. Austerity is about money, supporting music…or any art form is not, it’s about cutting your coat according to your cloth as they say. If you can’t get gigs in the few venues left operating, put your own on in alternative locations, play cafes, basements, churches, parks, house parties or art spaces. You might even consider hitting the streets and busking! Old School. Music must find a way.This year is going to be about thinking outside the box as the music scene takes the time it needs to get back on it’s feet. But remember, wherever the gig takes place, it still needs to be supported, so lets have none of the old excuses. If you are feed up by music being represented by a twerking twerp like Ms Cyrus, Nickleback (probably the worst Pearl Jam tribute band in the world) or anything that is the product of a TV show, from X-Factor to Glee, then get involved with grass roots music, whilst there is something still to get involved with.

 

Right, it may be a quiet week, but there are still a few choice cuts to be dined on. At The Victoria tonight, Secret Chord Records have a showcase of just some of the acts that they have handpicked to work with throughout the coming year, so the quality control has been done for you. Headline are the band who’s recent album seems to be as popular in Japan and New York as it is in Swindon, Super Squarecloud (pictured). A wonderful alchemizing of skewed pop, mathy interludes, time signatures that have more to do with quantum physics than music, the result is some of the most original sounds you will hear in ages. Support comes from Bristolians, Armchair Committee a band who combine the howling blues riffs of the Jack White school of cool with monumental stoner riffs and a impressively joyous noise. Opening the night Faye Rogers delicate folk palette is very much the calm before the storm.

 

Friday is the night for acoustic music, The Victoria has  Pirate Joe, a wonderful collection of improvisation, looping effects, comedy and multi-instrumentation. Support comes from the brilliant Jimmy Moore, the enigmatic Zackie Chan plus local stalwarts Hiproute.

 

At Riff’s Bar the first of the new Acoustic Sessions kicks off with Darren Hodge, who I can find almost no information about on the internet and Adam Sweet who plays bluesy acoustic rock.

 

For something a bit more rock and roll, now re-patriated with the land of his birth, David Marx brings his AK-Poets back to The Rolleston, a riot of raucous riffs and manic melodies…not to be missed.

 

Saturday sees the welcome return of Iron Hearse to The Victoria, a wonderful mix of kick-ass rock, doom infused anthems and old school metal. Warming up the crowd for them are Hot Flex and a bag of suitable covers.

 

 

And finally The Rolleston features one of the youngest and most talented electric bluesmen on the circuit, Laurence Jones who takes influence from legends such as Albert Collins and Tony McPhee. This is a player who is keeping the genre alive and fresh and marching into the 21st Century.

 

So there we go, welcome to 2014.