Tag Archive: people like us


thumbnail.jpegThere have been some busy weeks when it comes to live music of late and this one has to be the busiest of the lot. I have covered as much as I can below but space being what it is, some gigs are not going to make the cut so please check out the website or page of your favourite band a and venues to fill in some of the gaps. You can’t say that nothing ever happens in this town.(You could but you’d be wrong.)

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imgID153440369.jpg.galleryAcoustic music from both ends of the spectrum can be found in town tonight. Firstly Walker Broad returns to The Beehive for a full band show , trading in folk and jazz infused bluesy-rock; think Steeleye Span meets Steely Dan, slick, smooth and exceedingly clever. If something more raucous is required then True Strays at The Victoria are what you are looking for, if what you are looking for is the sound of a bunch of jobbing raggle-taggle folk-blues wranglers playing for the dime and delight of juke joints and cowboy bars in the dustbowl days of 1930s America.

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535044_957872154288230_8248712935002350898_nAnd so as the final note from the final encore of the final band of this year’s Shuffle fades into the night, things can return to the more usual spread of bands and venues. A quieter week perhaps, a more predictable week in many ways but still with plenty of great music to act as the soundtrack to the summer.

Tonight sees the old-time blues flavours and mellifluous roots vibes of Damon T and Mark Cole return to the Beehive. This Anglo-American guitar and harmonica hook up is a must for anyone passionate about authentic delta blues and ragged country sounds. The real deal indeed.

On Friday Black Max and The Pirates mix nautical shenanigans with 2-Tone and ska/punk at The Rolleston whilst The Beat Routes bring a deft and delicious selection of funk and soul covers to The Beehive. (Note: please check the dates regarding this and the previous gig at that venue, at the time of writing there seems to be a bit of confusion as to the relevant days.)

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26166586_1681465711875033_8057004855056739838_nThere was an interesting debate on Facebook the other day regarding the balance between original and non-original bands in town. Between all of the threads full of ill informed political infighting and pictures of cats falling off things, the old battle lines were drawn again and it seems as if many people think that there is some sort of conspiracy designed to hold back the original scene, which of course is nonsense. It’s all about market forces, venues and pubs are businesses and they exist by selling drinks, the more the better, so it obviously makes more sense to book bands with a known draw than some unknown Tibetan infused dream-pop band from Newport Pagnall. It’s as simple as that.

If you want to see more original music, bigger names playing more convenient nights of the week then you first have to prove that it can compete, and you do this by supporting the smaller shows which are already happening. Do that, and apart from the two usual venues championing original music, other venues will see the profit in it and there will be more on offer. It’s as simple as that. And buy a CD on the way out too, even musicians need to eat.

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26170782_914630398738455_5843566105616402098_o 2Sadly it is time to morn the passing of another musical great. Mark E. Smith, the glorious leader of The Fall may not have had the mainstream success that other recently departed icons were known for, but he was an icon nonetheless. An icon of otherness, of belligerence, of the anti and the other, of subversion, things which are by and large missing from todays music. He walked a line between the brilliant and the bizarre, shows were as likely to be terrible as transcendental, lyrics were confrontational and strangely poetic and gigs were your own little secret. He could have steered the band towards stadium success but instead preferred to play above pubs in Bethnal Green or decrepit ex-discotheques in Wythenshawe! Wether you got him or not, loved him or loathed him we can all guarantee that the world will be a less interesting and more conformist place without him. Anyway…to horse, well, musically speaking.

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13407096_10153662274891463_6649436038957675124_n.jpgIn a world which seems ever more divided along political lines, knowingly supporting cash over climate issues, payola over peace and where a small very small sector of society pull the strings and calls the shots, wouldn’t it be good to have someone come along and make sense of it all. Not some dry political hack or firebrand orator but maybe a guy with a bass guitar, a hat and a bag of songs which point fingers, neatly satirises and gently ridicules the state of the world. It might not fix the problems but it sounds like a fun night out to me. Oh look, Grant Sharkey is at The Tuppenny tonight, what a co-incidence!

Meanwhile down at The Beehive, that excellent fellow Tim Manning is hosting his Acoustic Buzz night, a session dedicated to all things rootsy and this time around Boss Caine headlines the night, imagine Tom Waits singing Ryan Adams …if they had both had the good fortune to grow up in Yorkshire that is. Chris Webb is also on the bill, a finger-style folkie par excellence and your host will kick the night off with his song-blends of country and folk.

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