Tag Archive: richard wileman


Shuffle 2020 - Mini Shuffle 1 PosterGreetings fellow friends in isolation, we hope you are doing okay and looking out for one another. Obviously there are many more important things going on in the world right now than worrying about a local music festival but it is also at times like these that music, art, creativity in general, helps get us through or at least offers an oasis of calm where we can retreat to and forget the day-to-day worries for a bit. It is for this reason that we bring you news of a lovely little event happening this Saturday.

There have been a slew of video posts from friends and favourite artists helping to brighten the place up by sharing their songs from the sanctuary of their own homes so in the spirit of The Shuffle we thought that we would go one step further, assemble a whole bunch of our favourite musical people and put together a virtual mini-festival. A static shuffle if you like. A shufflette. A sonic soiree. And in the total reverse of our normal Shuffle antics, this time you get to stay put and we bring the performances to you.

Just so you know, as it stands we do expect the Shuffle to happen this year, but obviously everything depends on how long restrictions last, so stay indoors and follow the rules people, the sooner we get through this, the sooner we start seeing a bit of normality creeping back into our lives.

So, think of this groovesome gathering of sonic goodness, this front room fusion of music, this collection of cool kids and chipper tunes as a reminder that we will get through this and see each other at gigs again before long and also as something to help keep you sane in the meantime. 

So all you have to do is open our Facebook page here…

https://www.facebook.com/swindonshuffle/

…crack open your favourite tipple, grab some snacks, just relax and watch some familiar faces ply their musical trade. If it goes well, we might even do more.  So join us at 15.15 on Saturday for the Shuffle Lockdown and remember –

“Stay Home, Stay Safe, Enjoy Live Music!”

 

maxresdefault.jpgT. S. Eliot wanted us to believe that April is the cruelest month but then he was never spotted down the front of a gig, lost in the rapture that only comes from experiencing a good live band. Had he done so he might have cheered up a bit and written naughty limericks rather than long, epic poems about cultural depression. Anyway, enough about him and on with the recommendations…

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veil-coverOne of the restrictions of working with music that is so textured, intricate and dynamically fluid as Richard’s usual musical vehicle, Karda Estra, is that when it comes to live shows, the logistics surrounding the amount of players and gear that would be required to do the music justice is generally too prohibitive. Veil, therefore, feels like his pulling together a body of work, some new songs and instrumentals and some reworked pieces from the Karda Estra canon, that can form the basis of small, intimate live shows. Shows that can range from solo performances to slightly enhanced versions of the same as space and musician availability dictates.

What is great is that you get the best of both worlds, new, stripped back sonic journeys but ones which are built on the same creative pulse, musical references and progressive world view as Karda Estra. (Progressive here is used in the broader, genre hopping, rulebook ignoring sense, rather than any connotations of people dressed as wizards, singing about epic quests…possible performed on ice!)

Last Grains has a wonderful 60’s chamber pop feel, cascading vocals and jaunty guitar work really putting a Chelsea booted spring in the song’s step and at the other extreme Unmarked on Any Map is a haunting piece of pop noir. And alongside these more song based approaches, the more fluid form classical explorations are also given room. Andromeda Variations for Guitar being, as the name would suggest, a wonderfully dexterous, short acoustic guitar piece, hints of Iberia hanging between the darker passages and Amy Fry’s spotlight moment, Chaos Theme For Clarinet, hanging between the sound of a Midtown Manhattan jazz lounge and a slightly whimsical dystopian soundtrack.

It is a collection of songs that shows that even without the usual wide array of musical trappings, the heart of Karda Estra, and Richard Wileman’s music in general, is just as wonderfully mercurial and beguiling even when stripped down to its core. It shows too that the intricacies and originality are central to the way he writes and not merely the result of hanging strange textures and off kilter layers on more conventional structures. And more than anything, if this album marks Richard as a more regular fixture on the gigging circuit, for that alone it is an important step.