Tag Archive: steve cox


12654486_10153972441136757_7705425637639042490_nAnother busy week ahead for our music venues so I will get straight on with things, stopping only to mention that this is my 300th gig guide for the paper. Ballpark figures make that about 250, 000 words (if you include the extra reviews I throw in) a high percentage of them the likes of “ethereal,” “effervescent,” “fruition” and “plethora,” …blimey, no wonder I get called pretentious!

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The second Swindon Repair Cafe will be tomorrow afternoon:
Sunday 29 November between 2-5pm at Savernake Street Social Hall, Savernake Street, Swindon SN1 3LZ.

We’re delighted that Steve Cox will be joining us to perform!!

We’ll have…bike repairs and security marking, repairs for clothes textiles, laptops, bric a brac/ornaments, jewellery etc…
Crafts area – make a pom pom in less than 10 minutes!

Live music by Steve, and Josh Wolfsohn (S’Go, Cowshed Ceilidh Collective)

Delicious cake from The Olive Tree Cafe (TWIGS)
All FREE – just buy some cake if you’d like to support this community project

swindon105_5logo-300x186This week Sean & Dave have Steve Cox in Session with some great live music and talk about all things Mr Love and Justice and Lazy Sunday Afternoons at the Arts Centre. Also music from Talk in Code, Nick Felix, Pete Taylor, NewQuay Times and music and an interview with El Born.

http://seanhodgson.podomatic.com/entry/2014-01-17T03_38_19-08_00

Library - 91Had Good King Wenceslas looked out of my window, far from seeing snow that was deep and crisp and even, he would have seen un-gritted roads and snow sculptures that either look like something out of a Tim Burton movie or designs that are too unsavoury to be discussed here. And looking at the snow it got me thinking that unlike the cheesy results when Christmas is used as the subject of a song, the topic of snow has generated some wonderful results. Underground classics such as Driven Like The Snow by obtuse grumps The Sisters of Mercy, the hauntingly beautiful Fifteen Feet of Pure White Snow by Nick Cave (although the underlying message is about something far darker of course) and in typical humour Frank Zappa’s, Don’t Eat The Yellow Snow.

 

Well hopefully the snow related chaos that has caused so many gig cancellations over the last week are behind us, especially as one of the bands playing Songs of Praise at The Victoria tonight are coming all the way up from Cardiff. Spyglass mix up heavy alt-rock grooves with a melodic grunge density and will be playing the support slot to SkyBurnsRed, a band who incorporate classical grandeur, raw, dark and emotive rock, sensuous violin and an aggressive delivery. Also taking their chosen genre to new heights is opener Adepto Futui, a band that captures the feeling, vibe and voice of traditional blues but who manage to twist it into interesting, Byzantine heavy and original shapes.

 

Meanwhile down at The Beehive an interesting local proposition is taking place. Having grown out of the Lazy Sunday Afternoon Sessions at the Art Centre, Fieldfare is the combined acoustic guitar and vocal arrangements of local stalwarts, Steve Cox, Paul Griffiths and Tim Sawyer reworking each other’s songs.

 

There are a few big shows at The Furnace this week; the first comes in the form of Cheltenham’s Young Kato on Friday. Pop may be a dirty word these days but along with LAB label mate Portia Conn, they will be proving that there is a lot more to the genre than dance routines and auto-tuners. Pop beats, warm atmospherics and infectious melodies collide with confident guitar-work to re-establish the credibility of the genre. Also on the bill Old Colours continue to ply their trade of fragile, cinematic, otherworldly indie creations and Salute the Magpie open the show. If something more raw, lewd and beardy is to your taste then check out The Hamsters From Hell in The Rolleston next door.

 

Back at The Beehive and another Cheltenham band, Stressecho indulge the venue with a wonderful angst-folk set, beautiful, understated music to accompany poignant and open story telling.

 

More big noises at The Furnace on Saturday, this time taking a much more aggressive format with hard edged pop-punk from south coast trio, Hold The Fight and local, upbeat, post-hardcore champions When Words Fail. Back upstairs in The Rolleston there is a bit of a paradox. Metal Gods claim to “try and bring something fresh to the scene” which is obviously commendable but then state that they play classic rock covers from the 80’s/90’s. Not sure what to make of that, still that’s not to say it won’t be a good night out for those still proudly holding on to their patched denim jackets and Let It Rain tour shirts.

 

 

Riffs Bar play the acoustic card and have a collection of acts both local and otherwise  playing in a very stripped down fashion, including the 50’s rock and roll vibe of Josie and The Outlaw, the wonderful harmonies and intricate guitar blends of Ethemia and the joyous and upbeat creations of The Real Raj.

 

Missin’ Rosie seem determined to invoke the wrath of the folk police (they do exist, I checked with the Home Office) by taking folk music and rocking it up to a point where those people who denounced Dylan for going electric in ’66 would be jumping off of tall buildings. Catch their mix of standards and originals at The Sun Inn on Sunday.

 

And so we end in our usual mid week oasis of music and two options. If you haven’t had enough of the loud and shouty, then Teenage Kicks at The Furnace has a Headbanger Special on Wednesday with music and neck ache courtesy of Twisted State of Mind, Dissolute, Wreckoning and Stands To Reason.  A more mellow listening experience can be had at The Running Horse with the wonderful Rosellys whose British-American ranges from acoustic country to stomping bluegrass, from gentle balladry to barn dance hoedowns. Not what you expect from the M4 corridor on a chilly midweek evening.

 

Lazy Sunday Afternoon – Volume 1

Library - 61Despite the Councils increasing departure from supporting anything remotely cultural in Swindon (the loss of Big Arts Day, price hikes on room hire etc), there is still a small band of people who with a labour of love work ethic make good things happen. A classic example of that is the monthly Lazy Sunday Afternoon shows that have been taking place at The Arts Centre Café, thanks to Steve Cox and Mr Love and Justice, and which alongside the acoustic shows at The Running Horse, has become the major showcase for acoustica, folk and roots music. This compilation brings together the acts to be found at those shows and represents the pick of the crop from that part of the local scene.

The album kicks off with a band that I am already a major fan off, Rumour Shed. The River, take from their wonderful e.p. Postcards For Mother is a song that displays their essence, despite since evolving into a full band.  Sensual and hushed vocal tones mix with delicate guitar work as a mournful cello wanders through the background, the result is a song that is poetically rich, dreamlike, ethereal and quietly majestic.

Ethemia offer a cleaner limbed though no less evocative approach, more traditional to the acoustic folk genre. Fingerprints  On Me works so well because the duo knows how to combine two vocals and two guitars without getting in each other’s way. Imagine if The Civil Wars instead of being seeped in the lore of Nashville and the music of the deep south  were instead forged of The West Country and a more idealized pastoral tradition and you then have a useful handle on this duo.

One band that manage to effortlessly wander between Celtic, Americana and the English folk theme is Bateleurs, though this track, Go React, sees them at very much west of the Atlantic shore and  south of the Mason Dixon line. Steel pedal guitars and simple country rhythms define the song, which combines space, groove and accessibility in one neat little package.

Also in some way informed by a background American vibe, albeit a psyched out west coast wash, Mr Love and Justice’s contribution, Watching Water, is a chilled, psychedelic underground pop classic. There are times when the band immerses themselves in left wing politics, historical themes and a social awareness that seemed to have been lost in modern music. Here though they are happy to use more vague imagery and more subdued tricks to paint their musical picture. What a great picture it turns out to be.

Taken from an album that is described as a“dancers take on life…for lovers of words, rhythm, roots, rhyme and reason” Run Away To Extinction is perhaps the most experimental of all the tracks featured here. Kim Coupland delivers spoken word over a minimal Cajun or chilled zydeco musical backdrop where the pattern of the words seems to define the shape of the song. The hypnotic musical cycles coupled with the maritime descriptions that overlay them make for a very different yet fascinatingly memorable experience.

Having evolved from a pickup band into a stable and permanent line up, aural candy are more or less a pop band, but a pop band that follows a heritage that links bands such as XTC, Julian Cope, Robyn Hitchcock even the later Beatles outputs rather than anything the term suggests today. Down, Down, Down is a slice of chilled pop-rock that combines accessible music with a dark lyrical message. Nice.

Blake is the one act on the album that is truly new to me and one that I will definitely be checking out further. Lush vocal harmonies and chiming guitar rhythms seem to be the hallmark, but that is just the tip of the iceberg. Too Dark, Too Deep is built of layers of lush instrumentation, accordions take the lead breaks as the sound of balalaikas add an exotic air to this wonderful slice of soulful folk-pop.

Sweet William by Jess Vincent is probably the most authentic folk piece on the album, by authentic I mean it’s the one piece that would conform to the stringent rules and regulations set down by that shadow outfit known as the  Folk Police. In a Kate Rusby sort of fashion it takes a timeless sounding song and gives it a contemporary production, the result is a song that could have been written anytime in the last three hundred years but with the benefit of modern instrumentation and studio techniques, so the best of both worlds really.

The album bows out in the hushed manner with which it kicked off. Tim Graham understands the meaning of space and is not afraid to use it, which he does  to glorious affect on Too Good To Burn. The song seems as built as much on anticipation and atmosphere as it does on vocal delivery and music and the overall affect is fantastic. Again delving into an English folk tradition and reminiscent of the likes of Nick Drake or Bert Jansch, this is a song that really explores the less is more concept and a perfect swansong for the album.

As an overview of the roots and acoustic scene that forms a significant part of Swindon’s musical activity, this is an essential album and showcases just what a great pool of bands we have to work with. Aside from  it’s showcasing qualities, it is also simply a great collection of songs and as is says Volume One under the title, I am looking forward to the appearance of a second selection of bands. Well done to Homeground Records, Steve Cox and all concerned.